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Updated May 1, 2006
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Messages: We need to hear from you. These injuries and deaths are being widely ignored. Your story can help convince people that this is serious. Contact us via the Membership page or, if you prefer, the Contact page.

We are building a case registry for scientific study. You can contribute your details to the study without being quoted here, if you wish. No one is quoted here without permission. Contact us via the Contact page.


4/30/06 Brent:

We have a duty, those of us who have survived and are still able to fight. A duty to those who have not survived or who cannot fight. A duty to those who are being silently attacked now, who are wondering why their leg is sore, why their chest hurts. A duty to those who will be attacked tomorrow. This is probably the leading cause of death among healthy young adults, certainly the leading cause of death among endurance athletes. We need to make this known.

3/28/06 Steve Lehman:

I am 58-year-old endurance athlete and I developed blood clots. As a national and world champion bicycle racer, I believed I was "bomb-proof". I’m not. In fact, I’m lucky to be alive. The same blood and vascular system that have helped me achieve these lofty goals are also prone to producing a deadly, silent killer, the blood clot. You can see the details of my injury at Tri-State Velo News

3/7/06 Vince:

Count me as another endurance athlete felled by a damn bloodclot. If the airline (or anyone) had told me it could cost me my life, I certainly would have taken the simple precautions. Good Lord, I do a lot more just to shave a few seconds off a mile - why wouldn't I take simple precautions to avoid being taken out of the race entirely?

2/1/06 Ian: I had my initial DVT after a long flight from Kuala Lumpur to London via Amsterdam. I was aware of the risk of DVT and had taken a number of precautions, namely an aspirin before flight and was wearing Scholl flight socks. The DVT manifested itself as a slight niggle in my left calf. Had I not been aware of DVT symptoms I would have thought nothing of it. However a week after the flight I went to the doctors - within half an hour I was having an ultrasound scan and was diagnosed with DVT. I underwent the usual treatment Heparin injections followed by a three month course of Warfarin. I was 42 at the time and in good general health and not overweight.

My second DVT occured in October 2005 and was not associated with a long haul flight. It was however more serious and resulted in a week's stay in hospital. I am now on Warfarin treatment for life. My leg four months on still swells up in the evenings, and my lower leg is still discoloured. Other than that I'm OK with no mobility issues.

  

1/6/06 Kathy:

In August 2005, I flew 6 flights during a 2-week period. At the end of the second week, my legs were red, swollen and aching. I tried elevation, soaking them in cold water and anti-inflammatories, but nothing helped. After 2 weeks I went to my family doctor. He gave me water pills, but they didn't help. After a period of time, the swelling went away, but I felt weak, tired and very short of breath. This lasted for several weeks.

In October 2005, I took a new position that required several flights every week. On November 13, 2005 I was hospitalized with bilateral pulmonary emboli. I could hardly breathe.

I didn't recognize the symptoms of PE in August but I now realize that I had a less serious case of PE then. I am convinced that my body can't handle multi-leg, frequent flights.

11/1/05/05 Gary:

I went on my first international flight last month, from Houston to the Netherlands and on to the Czech Republic. Two weeks after I returned I began to develop all of the symptoms of a PE, however I had no idea at the time, so I went to my family doctor and he took an x-ray and ordered some blood work. The next day I could not breath and was rushed to the emergency room and later that day diagnosed with a PE. I spent 8 days in the hospital, for what is certainly totally preventable.

I feel like the Airline KLM failed to warn me of the potential dangers of traveling on such a long flight. Instead of warning about dehydration they were serving free beer and coffee. Nor was I warned about the dangers of sleeping through the flight. I am 6'2 and could not even move in my seat.

If I had known about the dangers, I would have flown business class, drank plenty of water, no alcohol or coffee. Do I have any legal recourse against KLM?

10/3/05/05 Cindy:

I am an active 37 year old female. I read gas meters walking approximately 10 miles a day. I had fallen over a fence and hurt my right leg. I continued to work and within the next week I had alot of swelling of my right leg. I went to doctors and he sent me for a doppler which confirmed that I had a DVT.

9/5/05 John:

I had a DVT with PE on April 26 of this year. I do not have any of the risk factors for DVT. I am 51 years old and am very physically fit with low BP and a low resting pulse. I have been strenuously exercising for over 30 years.

On the morning of April 26th, I was examined by my primary physician and reported the following symptoms: - Tender Achilles tendon - Swollen right ankle and calf muscle - Chest pain from the bottom of the left pectoral to the collar bone and part way up the neck. - Difficulty breathing (especially when lying down) - Night sweats and chills

My doctor incorrectly diagnosed a leg injury and attributed my chest pain to stress. He also said I may have a virus. I was sent home with a prescription for ibuprophen.

Later that night, the chest pain was so severe, my wife had to drive me to the hospital. The ER doctor thought the chest pain and swollen ankle could be related and ordered a d-dimer blood test, which was abnormal. A subsequent cat scan and ultra-sound revealed a DVT behind my right knee and a PE in the left lung that infarcted, damaging the lower portion of the lung.

I was hospitalized for 6 days, 4 in intensive care. I am presently taking coumadin and will do so for 6 months. I had never heard of DVT before this happened to me and was surprised at the lack of public education for something that causes so many deaths.

8/23/05 Paul:

I am recovering from a pulminory embolism and dvt. I am 44 years of age and prior to this event was a cyclist and weightlifter. Exercise did not appear to help me.

7/7/05 Jack:

Re. air travel and short haul trips, I recently survived a PE after a flight of only 2.5 hours. Endurance training could be involved. I have health rider power ramp (elliptical trainer) used four times a week, bike when possible, and I am building a cottage.

6/21/05 John:

I twisted my ankle on a business trip (excuse the pun) and flew back from Copenhagen to Stansted, UK, a two hour flight, a day later. I developed a swelling and tenderness behind the knee during the flight and visited local hospital the following day. A fractured fibula was diagnosed. Despite concerns over possible DVT I was advised this was unlikely. Not one of the medical staff thought a recent flight was a risk factor! During the following ten days I developed shortness of breath etc and was rushed at my own insistence for proper testing, when I was found to have a massive DVT and also life threatening PE. I nearly died.

6/12/05 Marc:

I am an Olympic athlete and for the past 5 years have had fluctuating health and numerous cases of what we thought was pleuracy (infection of chest lining). Recently I had a massive DVT and hence pulmonary emolism! Inspection found scars through out my lungs indicating previous PEs!

You talk about other olympians on your site. Any chance you could put me in touch with them? I realy want to know a time scale for getting back on my feet and reaching fitness I have never been able to reach before becuse of my dvt's.

  

6/10/05 Linda Bell:

I am a Flight Attendant and just got treated for DVT. I took Lovenox for 5 days and am on Coumadin. The clot was in my right thigh about 2 inches above the knee. The hematologist said that I could go back to work now, less that two weeks into treatment.  

I feel very uncomfortable with this decision because I still have pain and swelling from the clot. The company doctor told me that It's probably okay to return to work because it is unlikely for flight attendants to get DVT.  He said that it is the passengers that get it. I think that I am living proof regardless of what he thinks.  

Is it common for flight attendants with DVT to return to work so quickly? Is it safe? I'm so scared and at the same time I don't want to end my career. I would appreciate letters from other flight attendants forwarded to me if possible. I am 43 years old and very athletic. I run 4 to 6 miles a day!  

6/9/05 Diana:

One week after a trip from Detroit to Australia I had pain in my low back radiating down to my knee. I thought it was a backache from being cramped up during the flight. A week later the pain was getting worse. When I went to the ER I expected to come home with a prescription for muscle relaxants. Instead I was treated for a femoral DVT.

I'm off the coumadin now but I still have pain in that leg whenever I'm still for too long or at the end of the day. I guess it's too early to know whether the pain is permanent or will fade in time. I have been told that the next pregnancy will probably be considered high-risk.

I'm 37 years old, was not taking birth control pills, and I was working out everyday with heavy weights and cardio. I thought blood clots happened to people who were old or sick with cancer. I never thought it could happen to me, so anything you can do to get the word out is OK with me.

6/8/05 Tim Stuart:

My fiance, Emma Christoffersen, died in september of 2000 while traveling back from the Olympics in Australia. Her death sparked world wide media attention, and I have been fighting her case in the english courts for the past 5 years. It is due to be heard in the House of Lords (UK's Supreme Court) in october.

Emma was 28, fit, and dropped dead in the arrivals hall at Heathrow literally seconds off the plane. She had complained of chest pains about a week into her holiday. She was diagnosed with a chest infection given tablets and sent away. Two weeks later she was dead! My life has been ruined and Emma paid the ultimate price. Take all the precautions you can. DVT and air travel is real and it is happening now!

3/14/05 Tom:

I flew round trip from Boston to Austin (via Atlanta) 3 weeks ago, ran 21 miles as part of the Freescale marathon. Flew back to Maine, and 2 weeks later had a PE. Was misdiagnosed as pleurisy at first since pleural effusion was visible on x-ray. Blood oxygen and D-Dymer tests failed to indicate PE but thanks to a pulmonologist's persistence the correct diagnosis was made via CT scan and a PA (pulmonary arteriogram).

I am a fit 50 year old in good shape, resting pulse of 42, with none of the usual risk factors for DVT. I'm running again, with no apparent ill effects other than missing a couple of weeks of training for the Boston Marathon. But I won't complain about that, considering what might have been. Count me among the converted to appreciation of the risks of flight for runners. I'm spreading the word.

3/13/05 Denise LaGasse:

It's hard to think seriously about maintaining good circulation when you're flying business class and everyone is lounging or sleeping. My ankles often swell during air travel, but after a flight to Italy one ankle stayed swollen. Then I noticed a little shortwindedness. Then, after a flight to Florida, I had knee inflamation and in January I was hospitalized with pulmonary embolisms.

I've lost 5% of lung function but I can do three miles per day of fast walkng. I'm wearing compression stockings but I have to use the full-length version and they're hard to keep up, even with running tights over them.

On warfarin, a woman's bleeding can be life threatening. I've had to be hospitalized twice. I am suddenly a "high-risk case" for surgery, surprising for a 48-year-old who used to run the Cape Cod Marathon.

2/23/05 Sharon Hind:

My husband, a healthy 53, developed DVT October '03 after a flight from Phoenix to Providence. He spent a week in the hospital and was out of work for four months. Now, after more than a year, he still has some discomfort and cramping in that leg. Some days are worse than others. He faithfully wears the compression stocking, but he still has a lot of problems and we're beginning to realize that he probably always will. He has to have his blood taken every couple of weeks to make sure the dosage of warfarin is working. The Doctor says he'll be on it for the rest of his life. His DVT, and the after effects have turned our lives upside down.

2/20/05 Richard Rouse: I exercised daily on my x-country ski machine, swam laps in my pool and followed a vegetarian diet rich in vitamin K (which tends to promote clotting factors.) I was in excellent health with a low at-rest heart rate. In early August I had a minor colonoscopy with 2 polyps removed. After a 4-hour flight the following week I felt a pain behind my left knee. I tried to work it out through Yoga and exercise. My left calf was hot, red and swollen. I saw a sports MD who prescribed leg strengthening exercises and Advil.

After 2 weeks with no improvement a second sports MD gave me the same prescription again. Both doctors said they checked for a DVT through pulling and massaging my leg. After three more weeks with no improvement, the second doctor sent me for an ultrasound which identified the DVT. Then a CT-Scan and a VQ-Scan found a clot in my lung. I spent 10 days in the hospital hooked to an IV and a heart monitor. It was not fun. Now my leg is still swelling on use, and my life is altered.

2/19/05 Mike Reynolds: Messages went unposted for several months. We are catching up; another dozen will be posted shortly.

Endurance athletes continue to be at greatest risk, facing a draconian triple whammy. First, they hurt themselves by assuming that they have a muscle injury. The clot grows while they try muscle injury treatments. Then their doctor also assumes a muscle injury and the vein suffers further damage while they wait for the muscle to recover. Finally, the badly damaged vein leads to chronic pain, swelling, and partial disability, a cruel fate for anyone, but especially so for a person who worked so hard to achieve excellent physical condition.

1/7/05 Mike Ellis: I live in Boulder, CO, a bit over a mile high. About two days after a triathlon last June, I fractured three vertebrae due to previously undiagnosed osteoporosis. I was flat on my back for several days with no prophylaxis for DVT and I developed PE.

My warfarin therapy ended about 6 weeks ago, and my first flight is coming up in a couple days. Makes me kind of nervous. My doctor prescribed Lovenox for the flight and told me I don't need to use compression stockings. Of course, you can't trust everything a doctor says. One of my other doctors told me to wear Leggs when I fly and take an aspirin before I go. Another doctor told me that aspirin was useless.

A few months prior to my incident, a friend of mine, a 37 year old athletic woman, developed a PE after a long car drive. My anecdotal experience tells me that being athletic and being immobile is risky; neither of these cases involved flying.

(Notes: 1. Most doctors think athletes are at low risk for DVT and they order no anti-DVT measures for athletes during hospitalization. 2. Support stockings like Leggs may be do more harm than good. See our Compression Hose page. 3. Aspirin is not effective for venous clotting but is effective for arterial clotting and is recommended.)

11/12/04 Guy McRee: (gave terse answers to our questions): Off Coumadin. I wear a compression hose every day. Still some pain. Flight from Orlando to Little Rock. Symptoms were pain and swelling. I was 39. (Can we quote you?) Sure.

8/19/04 Tom Isbell:

An avid bike rider, I bike to work, 12 miles each way. My left leg would always be swollen after a long bike ride. I thought it was due to over training, but the problem continued so, after some internet searches and seeing my doctor, I had an ultra sound that confirmed DVT.

It struck me that there are a lot of similarities between the close quarters of a long air flight and the way that people confine themselves at their desks during the workweek. I wrote an article on DVT in endurance athletes that you can see at Active.com (active.com/story.cfm?story_id=11424&sidebar=21&category=cyc).

8/10/04 anon

I was misdiagnosed prior to getting on an 11 hour flight. The first doctor told me I had tendonitis. My wife bugged me to get a second opinion and a doctor at another hospital diagnosed the DVT. I was admitted immediately. Now I am on warfarin for the next 6 months. My doctor did not mention compression stockings, which apparently I should be using.

7/27/04 DS

As a pilot on long international flights, I enjoyed your article on Airhealth. You failed to explain what is best for hydration. You warn against drinking airline tank water! Well, what do we drink? I feel the need to drink alot of water and your article confused me saying do not drink water. Please explain. Hydration is very important on long flights.

(Our hydration page has been updated.)

7/24/04 anon.

In mid-May of 2004 I traveled roundtrip to San Francisco from my home in NYC on Jet Blue Airlines. After seven weeks of pain DVT was diagnosed in my popliteal vein. My doctors initially though I had strained my calf although I had no reason to suspect that. Later I saw a vascular surgeon, who himself thought it was nothing serious at first examination.

Finally (and luckily) I was hospitalized. Due the lengthy period of time that my DVT went undiagnosed I am likely to develop post-thrombotic syndrome which would substantially change my active lifestyle. I continue to be in pain. Otherwise, I am a healthy fifty-year-old male.

If Jet Blue had given any information regarding the potential connection between DVT and air travel I could have taken an informed proactive approach. I could have gotten treatment much sooner and avoided the risk of PTS. I hold Jet Blue responsible for this and I have filed suit against them.

6/15/04 Rhonda

Three years ago I suffered a DVT and multiple PE's after a non-stop flight from Philadelphia to New Orleans. I had crushing chest pain, a cold sweat and breathlessness immediately after the 4-hour flight. Still, I didn't connect my symptoms with the flight until a begrudging visit to the ER the next night. An alarmed ER doc made the connection as soon as I told him about the plane ride. The main embolus in my right lung was so large that he and others marveled that I'd survived through the night and a day of work.

As a newspaper reporter, I considered myself generally well-informed. I was wrong.

I didn't expect to be suffering from repercussions of that injury through today but I've had at least 4 episodes of clots since then.

6/3/04 Runner, 68

I suffered a PE in April ‘04. I am a runner averaging 25 miles per week. The previous 10 days I had been on a business trip involving relatively short flights of just over an hour. I did sit for quite a few hours each day on hard wooden benches (court room as an expert witness). The small embolus was in my left lung. DVT was in my right popliteal vein behind the knee. Have had various tests but so far the cause of my P.E. is unknown.

Incidently I found your site through Runners World and have passed it on to our running Club in Peachtree City, GA. Have planned a trip to Sweden in July and I am currently on coumadin for the next 6 months.

(Later) Yes I went to Sweden with Coumadin and compression stockings and had a great time. Came off Coumadin last October and protein tests were negative. Feel good and continuing with my fitness program of running and swimming. Use compression stockings when I travel any distance whatever the mode of transportation.

(Note: This runner, like most DVT/PE victims, tested negative for clotting disorders.)

5/18/04 Charles Bergman:

On a Northwest Flight from Osaka to Mobile, somewhere over the Alaska coast, my vision started blurring. This cleared up when we landed in Detroit but I still had problems focusing. It was late when we landed in Mobile the next morning I couldn't see out of my right eye. The emergency room said I had a central artery retinal occlusion. They told me it was like a stroke and I was lucky it went to the eye and not the brain.

A search led me to Dr. Jeffrey N Weiss, a retinal specialist who developed a procedure to break up the clot and return blood flow to the retina. Now I have a small area in my right eye with 20/20 vision and the rest is blind. Had I gotten to him sooner I could have totally recovered. Dr Weiss has a website at crvotreatment.com

I had asked the stewardess for more water but she said only had one bottle of water per passenger, even though I was flying First Class! If I could have kept myself hydrated maybe this would not have happened.

5/1/04 Elizabeth: After a Delta flight from Atlanta to Madrid in December '03, my father died at the airport in Madrid with a blood clot blocking his pulmonary artery . There were conflicting stories about whether anyone came to his aid as he died, but some of the facts indicate that he got no medical attention until long after he died. He was 61 and very fit, walking at least nine miles per week plus exercising at the gym, playing softball, and other activities.

In all my travels, as well as my family's and we have been travelling all over the world, I had never heard or was warned of the economy class syndrome. In fact, on some flights we were told not to move from our seats and not to walk around or congregate near the bathroom area, for security reasons!

4/24/04 Sharon Hind:

My husband, a healthy 53, developed DVT last October after a flight from Phoenix to Providence. The doctors told him that he had the "mother of all clots” and that air travel was the cause of it. He spent a week in the hospital and was out of work for four months. As of now he is on blood thinners and probably will be forever. He still has pain and swelling and cannot walk long distances. It is horrible experience that is turning our lives upside down.

4/13/04 Mary McLaren, 48: Mary McLaren, 48: On December 31, on holiday in Australia, I fractured my foot. It was badly swollen but the doctor said to take asprin and I wouldn't get D.V.T. At our next stop in Singapore I had pain in my right thigh and it was swollen and discoloured. I took more aspirin and there was some improvement. Three nights later I awakened to pain in my leg which had swollen to three times its size, changed colour to blue and was too painful to bear weight. At Singapore hospital my husband was told that this was vey serious and they didn't think I was going to make it.

After twelve days in the hospital on Clexane I was able to return to the UK. My foot, ankle, leg and thigh are still badly swollen and if I stand/walk for any longer than a few minutes they discolour. I do not know when I will be able to return to work. I would like you to let other people know the danger they are in if they fly after a trauma to their leg/foot.

4/1/04 Oliver Roberts : Could you give us about 250 words for the UK edition of Runner's World responding to this question: "Is it wise to do a run shortly before or after a long flight to get the blood pumping through the legs?" (A run before a flight would lose all its benefit as soon as your pulse returns to rest. A run after flight would have no benefit and could be dangerous if there were a clot, which may or may not produce any symptoms.)

3/14/04 ML : You don't give enough attention to post-traumatic stress disorder, which often follows pulmonary embolism. For me it has been an endless black hole for three years. None of the things I used to enjoy have any appeal any more. Pretending to have fun with the family on the beach is a bitter struggle. What makes it worse is knowing that the airline gave me this nearly fatal injury and then left me to die. And they continue to do this to other people every day even though it would cost them virtually nothing to provide lifesaving information.

2/27/04 Kathy : I was 33 and very healthy, cycling every day. I flew for 3 hours from London to Rome, then took a ship to Sardinia (8 hours in a reclining chair). The symptoms troubled me after a couple of days and nobody was able to tell me what was wrong. The pharmacist advised salt tablets as they thought I was suffering from dehydration.

I was in a lot of pain on the journey home. A day or so later I was diagnosed by my GP with 3 blood clots in my left leg. Tests were done for predisposing factors such as clotting factor disorders. None came back positive.

I am currently trying to decide whether it is safe for me to make a long haul flight to see a friend who has a terminal illness. Your website has helped me gain the information that I need to decide (I think you know more than my doctor). If there are any studies that could use my details for their research I would be only too happy to help.

(We responded that we are making progress toward a publishable scientific study and every additional case helps.)

2/18/04 Mary McLaren, 48: On December 31, on holiday in Australia, I fractured my foot. It was badly swollen but the doctor said to take aspirin and I wouldn't get D.V.T. At our next stop in Singapore I had pain in my right thigh and it was swollen and discoloured. I took more aspirin and there was some improvement. Three nights later I awakened to pain in my leg which had swollen to three times its size, changed colour to blue and was too painful to bear weight. At Singapore hospital my husband was told that this was very serious and they didn't think I was going to make it.

After twelve days in the hospital on Clexane I was able to return to the UK. My foot, ankle, leg and thigh are still badly swollen and if I stand/walk for any longer than a few minutes they discolour. I do not know when I will be able to return to work. I would like you to let other people know the danger they are in if they fly after a trauma to their leg/foot.

2/17/04 Jay Corwin, MD I am an emergency physician with family members who have had a DVT and have risk factors for reoccurrence. There is a low molecular weight heparin available for prevention of DVT called Lovenox, also enoxaparin sodium. The trick is you have to give yourself an injection, but it is a relatively easy thing to learn (to do it in the stomach fat, not in a muscle.) My 85 year old mother learned to give herself these injections after having a small stroke. I have not seen this as a recommendation in the medical literature, but a person who has had a DVT and is going to take a long distance flight could ask their MD about a prescription for Lovenox to prevent DVT. Sometimes aspirin is recommended, but aspirin has been shown to prevent arterial clots and not venous clots.

2/17/04 Elizabeth: After a Delta flight from Atlanta to Madrid in December '03, my father died at the airport in Madrid with a blood clot blocking his pulmonary artery . There were conflicting stories about whether anyone came to his aid as he died, but some of the facts indicate that he got no medical attention until long after he died.

He was 61 and very fit, walking at least nine miles per week plus exercising at the gym, playing softball, and other activities. In all my travels, as well as my family's, and we have been traveling all over the world, I had never heard or was warned of the economy class syndrome. In fact, on some flights we were told not to move from our seats and not to walk around or congregate near the bathroom area, for security reasons!

2/9/04 Airline Pilot, 47: I fly long haul trips around the world. At 67 my father had a pulmonary embolism after a tennis injury. I use compression stockings and drink at least 8 ounces of water with electrolytes every hour. On my next trip I intend to add the use of Flite-Tabs.

I am considering writing an article for our company paper and if I do I will use some of the info on your web site. I have been passing out copies of your wallet card for some time now. It is hard to convince my fellow crew members of the risk when none of us had any problems. You and I know we have just been lucky.

1/11/04 Alan Morrow, 42:

After flights from Boston to Thailand via Australia, I went to Bumrungrad Hospital in Bangkok with a stroke. According to the doctors, this was caused by a clot formed during the extensive long distance travel. I had no risk factors for stroke: I was 42, had never smoked, exercised vigorously, had low body fat, no family history of strokes, and was in generally excellent health.

I am back to working part time and I do not have a lot of spare time due to a continued requirement for additional sleep. Workman's Compensation is paying part of my bills, although it appears that the laws in Massachusetts are heavily skewed in favor of the businesses.

1/8/04 Laura, 30:

I've been a flight attendant for over seven years. In early December '02 I suffered from a DVT in my left calf. I had come off a 10 hour flight and my legs were aching. The aching turned into pain which became unbearable. There was no redness but the area was very tender to touch. After examination at the hospital I was given an injection of heparin. It was a Friday and I had to wait until Monday to get a scan to confirm the blood clot.

I've done various ground duties since returning to work. My company have been very supportive but I have lost quite a lot of money due to lost allowances etc. Thrombophilia tests were negative. What do you think about any future flying?

Laura Smith, age 23: After a transatlantic flight, six doctors in two months were telling me I must have pulled a muscle; I could not possibly have a DVT due to my age (21) and fitness. It finally became too much to bear, I had no feeling in my in my left foot which was also very cold and I could not even sit down properly. I went to Emergency. The doctor finally did take me seriously and said it sounded like a DVT. An ultrasound scan showed an enormous clot behind my knee. I was told not to move and that I was lucky to be alive. After two weeks in the hospital and six months on warfarin, I still have constant problems.

I demanded a response from my doctors who failed to diagnose me, asking how they could juggle my life in their hands so carelessly. They said: "Oh, well we learn something new every day . It was extremely difficult to diagnose because of your age, the position of the clot (behind the knee) and because there was no swelling."

Because of all this, I am in far more pain, nearly all the time that could have been avoided if it were diagnosed earlier. I have permanent damage in the veins of my leg. I get pain lasting for days or weeks at a time and I worry whether it is another clot or just a bit of pain. I struggle a lot now and I worry about what it will be like when I get older.






For more messages, see
Messages 2003,
Messages 2002,
Messages 2001